Clean architectures in Python: a step-by-step example

One year ago I was introduced by my friend Roberto Ciatti to the concept of Clean Architecture, as it is called by Robert Martin. The well-known Uncle Bob talks a lot about this concept at conferences and wrote some very interesting posts about it. What he calls "Clean Architecture" is a way of structuring a software system, a set of consideration (more than strict rules) about the different layers and the role of the actors in it.

As he clearly states in a post aptly titled The Clean Architecture, the idea behind this design is not new, being built on a set of concepts that have been pushed by many software engineers over the last 3 decades. One of the first implementations may be found in the Boundary-Control-Entity model proposed by Ivar Jacobson in his masterpiece "Object-Oriented Software Engineering: A Use Case Driven Approach" published in 1992, but Martin lists ... more


Python Mocks: a gentle introduction - Part 2

In the first post I introduced you to Python mocks, objects that can imitate other objects and work as placeholders, replacing external systems during unit testing. I described the basic behaviour of mock objects, the return_value and side_effect attributes, and the assert_called_with() method.

In this post I will briefly review the remaining assert_* methods and some interesting attributes that allow to check the calls received by the mock object. Then I will introduce and exemplify patching, which is a very important topic in testing.

Other assertions and attributes

The official documentation of the mock library lists many other assertion, namely assert_called_once_with(), assert_any_call(), assert_has_calls(), assert_not_called(). If you ... more


Abstract Base Classes in Python

With the introduction of Abstract Base Classes, Python once again shows its nature of a very innovative and flexible language. It is interesting to see how such a remarkable feature has been introduced into the language by a pure Python module. This demonstrates that Python is built in a way that is very open to changes, thanks to its foundations in pure polymorphism based on delegation.

Many Python programmers overlooked Abstract Base Classes and the classes in the collections module, which are one of the simplest and useful applications of the concept. Sure enough, this is not a feature that you will use every day or that will change the way you are programming in Python. But neither is it something you shall discard before understanding what it brings into the language, and what sort of problems it can solve for you.

Level 1

EAFP

Python is a dynamically-typed object-oriented language strongly based on delegation, so its approach to problems is intrinsically ... more


Python Mocks: a gentle introduction - Part 1

As already stressed in the two introductory posts on TDD (you can find them here) testing requires to write some code that uses the functions and objects you are going to develop. This means that you need to isolate a given (external) function that is part of your public API and demonstrate that it works with standard inputs and in edge cases.

For example, if you are going to develop an object that stores percentages (such as for example poll results), you should test the following conditions: the class can store a standard percentage such as 42%, the class shall give an error if you try to store a negative percentage, the class shall give an error if you store a percentage greater than 100%.

Tests shall be idempotent and isolated. Idempotent in mathematics and computer science identifies a process that can be run multiple times without changing the status of the system. Isolated means that a test shall not change its behaviour depending on ... more


A simple example of Python OOP development (with TDD) - Part 2

In the first part of this small series I introduced you to TDD with Python by means of the powerful py.test package. We developed together a simple library which provides a Binary class that is a bit more useful than the default binary representation that Python provides with the bin() builtin function.

In this part I'll go on with the development of the library, discussing the implementation of a binary number with a fixed size, which is a very interesting and useful matter, being the foundation of the computer we are working with. Fixed-size binaries may also represent negative numbers with the two's complement technique, and this will be an important point to test.

You may happen to dislike some decisions about the interface or the behaviour of the resulting class. Since this post is just a way to show you a concrete TDD session you are totally free to change the tests and to come up with a ... more


A simple example of Python OOP development (with TDD) - Part 1

If you are eager to learn some Python and do not know how to start, this post may give you some hints. I will develop a very simple Python package from scratch, exemplifying some Object-oriented Programming (OOP) techniques and concepts, and using a Test-Driven Development (TDD) approach.

The package will provide some classes to deal with binary numbers (see the Rationale section), but remember that it is just a toy project. Nothing in this package has been designed with performance in mind: it wants to be as clear as possible.

Rationale

Binary numbers are rather easy to understand, even if becoming familiar with them requires some time. I expect you to have knowledge of the binary numeral system. If you need to review them just take a look at the Wikipedia entry or one of the countless resources on Internet.

The package we are going to write will provide a class that represents binary numbers (Binary) and ... more


Python decorators: metaprogramming with style

This post is the result of a lot of personal research on Python decorators, meta- and functional programming. I want however to thank Bruce Eckel and the people behind the open source book "Python 3 Patterns, Recipes and Idioms" for a lot of precious information on the subject. See the Resources section at the end of the post to check their work.

Is Python functional?

Well, no. Python is a strong object-oriented programming language and is not really going to mix OOP and functional like, for example, Scala (which is a very good language, by the way).

However, Python provides some features taken from functional programming. Generators and iterators are one of them, and Python is not the only non pure functional programming language to have them in their toolbox.

Perhaps the most distinguishing feature of functional ... more


Python 3 OOP Notebooks

The Python 3 OOP series of posts that you can find here is now available as a series of IPython Notebooks.

From the official site:

The IPython Notebook is a web-based interactive computational environment where you can combine code execution, text, mathematics, plots and rich media into a single document.

As a matter of fact, IPython Notebook is the perfect environment to teach Python itself. If you want to know more about this wonderful piece of software check the official site

You can find the notebook of each post here


Accessing attributes in Python

Python is a language that tries to push the object-oriented paradigm to its maximum. This means that its object model is very powerful compared to that of other languages, but also that the behaviour of Python code may result surprising to new programmers.

In this post I want to review the methods that Python provides to access object attributes, trying to provide a comprehensive overview of the matter to everyone wants to start programming in this beautiful language.

What are attributes

Since the nomenclature may vary from language to language, let me name things. In Python we call attribute everything is contained inside an object. In Python there is no real distinction between plain data and functions, being both objects, so what I will say about attributes is perfectly valid even for methods.

As a working example, in this post I will use the following class. It represents a book with a title and an author. It also provides a get_entry() method which ... more


Advanced use of Python decorators and metaclasses

Abstract

While introducing people to Python metaclasses I realized that sometimes the big problem of the most powerful Python features is that programmers do not perceive how they may simplify their usual tasks. Therefore, features like metaclasses are considered a fancy but rather unuseful addition to a standard OOP language, instead of a real game changer.

This post wants to show how to use metaclasses and decorators to create a powerful class that can be inherited and customized by easily adding decorated methods.

Metaclasses and decorators: a match made in space

Metaclasses are a complex topic, and most of the times even advanced programmers do not see a wide range of practical uses for them. Chances are that this is the part of Python (or other languages that support metaclasses, like Smalltalk and Ruby) that fits the least the "standard" object-oriented patterns or solutions found in C++ and Java, just to mention two big players.

Indeed metaclasess usually come ... more